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in egypt after negotiations break down between president morsi and judicial officials and people are are taking to the streets. >>> lawmakers back to work in the u.s. priority number one, avoiding the fiscal cliff. the left and right are talking compromi compromise. and the u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice, headed to c p capitol hill to meet with her most outspoken critics, answer questions about what happened in benghazi. benghazi. let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good evening. "outfront" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his position and u.s. officials who were praising the new leader for his role in negotiating a cease fire between israel and hamas, well now when he took all these powers away from judge
alert. more trouble in the middle east. this is in cairo, egypt. you can see the teargas wafting through the streets as protestors take to tahrir square and other places to protest against that country's new president, mohammed morsi. he has just assigned himself sweeping new powers. this comes after he helped broker that peace between -- that cease-fire between hamas and israel. perhaps thinking that he is suddenly a leader on the world stage he decided to announce that all of the decisions he has made since assuming office in january cannot be challenged by the egyptian courts. as you can see a number of especially young people in egypt none too pleased about this. they have been protesting in cairo and alexandria and other places. morsi of course an islamist, a member of the muslim brotherhood, the ideological ally of hamas. it is yet to be seen what the response will be from the obama administration to these new powers that he has awarded himself. he has also ordered a new trial for his predecessor hosni mubarak. we will continue to watch the troubles developing inee lit up and the p
center stage in protests in egypt. the president seizes more power, undermining the country's democratic reform. the turmoil follows a still fragile cease-fire in gaza as the middle east takes another volatile turn. >>> at home, white house critics press for more answers about what went wrong in libya, and whether officials were truthful with the public. >> i relied solely and squarely on the information provided to me by the intelligence community. i made clear that the information was preliminary. >>> my guests this morning weigh in. chairman of the armed services committee carl levin. and chairman of the house homeland security committee, new york republican peter king. then where does america stand on the verge of a second obama term in office? the economy, the fiscal cliff talks, the president's priorities in the next four years. our roundtable is here. david brooks of "the new york times." msnbc's reverend al sharpton. former ceo of hewlett-packard carly fiorina >> historian and film maker ken burns. and nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent andrea mitchell. and we'l
. more clashes in egypt over the weekend as police use tear gas this morning to disburse protesters in cairo. i want to start there. we have "new york times" columnist david brooks and our own andrea mitchell. andrea, this is because president morsi has seized power, a day after brokering a cease-fire between israel and hamas, he is now consolidating power. how worry side the administration about it? >> very worried, but they are very, very cautious because he is their new point of leverage really with hamas. he is the future, they thought, of trying to negotiate something and revive the israeli-palestinian talks. and now suddenly he seizes power. he was looking for this opportunity. he is threatened by the judiciary and the other mubarak forces who have, he believes, stopped the constitutional process and stymied that. but for him to do this now, at his point of greatest authority, puts the administration in a bind. and it's unclear how this is going to resolve. >> david brooks, there's a larger strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term
's always a pleasure. thank you very much. >> thank you. >>> and up next, protests in egypt and the turnover on the president's foreign policy team. we'll talk to dennis ross. >>> and still ahead, former bush national security adviser steven hadley, plus our correspondents in the field. this is "andrea mitchell reports" only on msnbc. sometimes what we suffer from is bigger than we think ... like the flu. with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking tamiflu and call your doctor immediately. children and a
" tonight, egypt on edge. is a new dictatorship on the horizon? tonight, president morsi clarified, but really largely stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping powers. including freedom from judicial review for what he's calling presidential decisions. the announcement was made today after morsi met with members of egypt's judicial body, which has been very critical of his decision. and u.s. officials who just days ago were heaping praise on the new egyptian leader for his role in initiating a cease-fire between israel and hamas, well, now when he took all these powers away from judges that reign supreme, they're in a tough spot. >> we have some concerns about the decisions and declarations announced on november 22nd. democracy depends on strong institutions and the important checks and balances that provide accountability. >> so, today, there were nationwide protests continuing in egypt and a million person march of anti morsi protesters is scheduled for tomorrow in tahrir square. the very spot where the revolution that cleared the way for morsi's presidency was born. now,
from egypt. thousands of protesters gathered in tahrir square. 6:15 at night there, many have been chanting step down in reaction to the decree issue by egypt's new president that grants him absolute power. the sixth straight day of protest after morsi issued his decree last thursday. earlier today, the protest turning violent on a street near tahrir square. at least three protesters have been killed since the weekend. nbc live from cairo. and the crowd in tahrir square has been growing, building over the past hours. explain what we're seeing now. >> reporter: well, behind me, probably tens of thousands of egyptians have gathered, been here since the early hours of the morning. in fact, some have been camped out for the past six days. many songs, chants, slogans reminiscent of two years ago, calling on the same things they did two years ago, which is for the president of egypt to step down. they've changed the name, obviously, to reflect egypt's new islamist president. you mentioned that incident today with the tear gas and the police, that took place outside the u.s. embassy. riot
strategic question. there's egypt, gaza, syria, iran. there's a president's second term that's got to be dominated by this region. >> i think so. it's the middle east, so there's good news and bad news. the good news is that the obama administration did an excellent job of supporting israel all through this. made israel feel moderate and the arabs feel realistic. the second piece of good news is that egypt, even under the muslim brotherhood, has an interest in having stability. that's very important. the bad news is the islamists are in control. in the palestinian areas with hamas and certainly in control in egypt. and there's going to be no peace as long as they are there in control, and u.s. policy has got to be a long, gradual process of trying to build up the non-islamists in the arab world, including in iran, across the region. >> that frames it. we'll hear more from you in the roundtable. >>> now let me turn to carl levin, chairman of course of the armed services committee in the senate. senator, to egypt. how concerned are you? is morsi a partner of the united states, or a p
the 35-day deadline passes. and congress gets back to work this morning. plus a power grab in egypt. mohamed morsi under fire for granting himself extraordinary powers. will that affect cease-fire talks between israel and hamas? they're happening in egypt today. >> and $59 billion! retail records broken as americans crowded stores for some competitive shopping over the weekend. and now cyber monday is here. will shoppers be in even more of a spending mood? >> you want to talk about money? a new powerball jackpot. a new record in the cash payout. it's unreal. >> a packed two hours ahead for you this morning. new jersey congressman bill pascrell will be joining us, grover norquist, jamie rubin, dr. hanan ashrawi, will be our guest, peter billingsley from a christmas story, and grinle college hoops star jack taylor. remember him? big game he had the other day. and the one and only tony bennett, monday, november 26th. welcome, everybody, "starting point" this morning. is that a hint of compromise in the air on capitol hill? 35 days left till we reach the fiscal cliff. and a couple of ke
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
. things are moving fast in egypt right now. we're going there to take you on the ride. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. you can stay in and like something... or you can get out there and actually like something. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>> he was the man of the hour, egypt's first democratically elected president. now morsi is being called aa would-be dictator and people are protesting. some are getting killed. massive crowds today at funeral of a protestor who died overnight fatally injured during demonstrations last week against morsi putting his decisions beyond judicial review. ever since he issued it the streets looked like this when millions rose to overthrow "the dictator" hosni mubarak. this it time they accuse him of a naked power grab. today he met with members of the highest judicial body and emerged saying it his edict was clarified. it remaining unclear. we have the late heest from cairo. this clari
. >>> overseas to egypt where the country's newly elected leader has granted himself unchecked power sparking days of clashes and sending the country's stock market into a freefall. our reporter is in cairo with the very latest. ayman, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. egypt's stock market opened for a second straight day, and it plunged already by 4%. now, that's already a day after it lost 10%, and officials there had to stop trading just to prevent it from declining any further. that's the economic turmoil this country finds itself in. there are tons of other political and social unrest unfolding across the egyptian capital, cairo. a short while from now, mourners are going to be praying for one of the victims, and they'll be burying him as well as another one that died in clashes overnight. as a result, egypt's president says he's going to hold meetings today with some of the country's top officials, including the judges who, over the past few days, have called for nationwide strikes. right now they and several other important unions including journalists and revolutionary group mo
to "early start." today a very important day in the middle east. particularly in egypt. delegations from both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement
that they will continue to play that role. the bigger problem is that this occupation is not egypt's fault. it is israel's fault. and it's unreasonable to expect egypt or turkey or any other country to put pressure on palestinians. what should be done instead is quite the opposite. the united states is the largest funder of israel. the united states gives $3 billion a year in u.s. taxpayer money to israel in addition to weapons, in addition to political support. if we're going to be serious about moving forward, the role has to come from the united states, pressure from the united states. it's not enough to demand that it come from egypt. >> diana buttu, many thanks for your time. we appreciate it. >> my pleasure. >>> back in the u.s., get ou of the way because black friday is here. people spend long hours in line to score major deals this morning. >> it's affordable right now even if you have to be out here for two days to get it. >> it saves a lot of money like a few hundred dollars. >> cnbc's courtney reagan is in dayton, ohio. how is it going so far out there? >> reporter: you know, so far it looks
looked at the meeting being anywhere near sufficient in clarifying. let's go to egypt where there are genuine foreign policy issues and contentions needing to be resolved. is he trying to rush this through too quickly? what do we know about what the document itself will look like, and whether or not it will be one that captures the democratic principles that we hope that egypt moves forward with. >> there are loads of questions and you put your finger on many of them. let's be hopeful to suggest that this may be a marchbury versus madison moment in egypt. you have constitutions playing their role. president morsi has been fighting hard to make sure there is an effective executive. you have a judiciary who wants to display its independence. unfortunately you don't have a parliament dissolved by egypt's equivalent of the supreme court. i think there are very serious questions about this constitutional assembly, not so much formation but 25% of it reflects the religious minorities and women have walked out because they don't think their issues are being adequately addressed. i
republicans who break their pledges to voters. also tonight, demonstrations for a sixth straight day in egypt. the united nations on statehood for palestinians tomorrow and the president's spokesman says the white house is not concerned with ambassador rice misleading the public on benghazi. pillows a prize-winning journalist, a former pentagon official said among our guests. we begin tonight with that triple digit rally on wall street. the market interpreted positive statements on a potential deal on the fiscal cliff by house speaker and rebounded from what had been a 112-point slide after the morning's opening bell. the dow jones industrials reversed, as i said, on the speaker's positive remarks and finished the session up 107 points. s&p up 11, nasdaq gained 24. all ten s&p 500 sectors moved higher on the day. that is the first time it has happened since october 4th. retailers drove the consumer discretionary sector energy industrials lead in the wake, and the rally started just minutes before house speaker made it clear that republicans are willing to deal on revenue and ready to find a r
, united states giving a bunch of money to egypt but did it take the money and run and turn its back on the united states? >> gretchen: there is a bomb shell. key evidence in the casey anthony trial may have been over looked whompt the heck was the prosecutor. and the bomb shell to convince the jury to convict her and didn't. >> brian: they didn't check firefox. [ mother ] you can't leave the table till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! this monday online only. get the droid razr by motorola in cranberry, free. or a white 7-inch samsung gaxy tab 2, just $99.99. this holiday, get the best deals on the best devices on the best network. exclusively at verizon. with thermacare heatwraps. thermacare works differently. it's the only wrap with patented heat cells that penetrate deep to relax, soothe, and unlock tight muscles. for up to 16 hours of relief, try thermacare. without freshly-made pasta. you could also cut corners by mak
the fiscal cliff. >>> developing now, new clashes in cairo, egypt today, between protesters and police. the protesters have been demanding that egypt's new president rescind the decree he had last thursday granting him absolute power. tens of thousands of protesters rallied in caikacairo's tahrir square. two of e jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculat
a parliament is formed here in egypt, until a constitution is drafted, he is the most powerful man in egypt, and, technically, he can do whatever he wants without any apparent oversight. that's why he is being called egypt's new dictator. that's why you have thousands of protests taking place behind us in tahrir square. the protesters represent the opposing factions, the liberals, the secularists, women's rights groups, the youth groups. essentially, their position is that we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he rescinds his decrees, and we spoke to one of his top advisors today, and he said he'll consider that, but first there needs to be a dialogue. let's take a listen to the advisor. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president. not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible -- >> we are ready for our dialogue. >> are you prepared to consider rescinding adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president. accepting it we may have some reservations, but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not two backward. mr. morsi
gauze why and israel and playing out in egypt. bring us up to speed. the rebels made some advancements. >> the rebels have scored some successes. they have captured a couple of rather small but still significant military installations, one little air base, they got a tank out of it, they destroyed a couple of helicopters, destroyed another couple of tanks that was seen -- because it was very close to damascus, seen as a major victory for them. moreover, moreover they changed their strategy. their strategy of trying to go into a major city, take it, and hold it. and they get pulverized in bombing campaigns that took so much of a toll on the civilian population. going right after the military, the military centers in and doing so, they're gaining arms. and expertise. there are more people that are joining them, the syrian military still a formidable force and the rebels probably not a match for them toe to toe but gaining strength. >> we know the geography, turkey to the north, turkey considering putting missiles on the border now? >> they're asking nato to consider it. they're sending a
. >> there are a couple of encouraging signs on the road to peace. today egypt's president said the aggression in gaza would end today and radio was saying a ceasefire could come tonight. since the fighting started a week ago more than 100 palestinians have been killed including 54 civilians according to the associated press. three israeli civilians have died. let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv for us and "washington post" columnist e.j. deion. mar martin, let me start with you. it sounds like, at least in the last couple of hours, they're getting closer to a deal. where do things stand? >> reporter: that's right. as you said, it is very encouraging signs. the fact that not only hillary clinton is coming and that the egyptian president said what he said and the israeli radio quoted their sources but also hearing seniors, including the arab league, suggests that leadership of various countries and organizations are coming to the region for an announcement which the vetting is that this evening hillary clinton will be meeting israeli prime minister and the betting is at that time the ceas
of peace looking at the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia and libya. the arab spring are in the state of transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each. this took place earlier this week in washington. it's two hours. >> good morning everyone. i'm steve heydemann for issues of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on the securities sector reform in the arab world and some rsvp to me have been scared by the false rumor that it would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that is not the case. so you do not need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you here with us all this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important but also especially urgent. i do not think that it is an exaggeration to say what happens with the security sectors in the arab world and by security sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus that
asking you about what's going on in egypt right now where muhammad morsi must feel pretty emboldened after playing such a crucial role in helping to broker a ceasefire between's reel and hamas. -- between israel and hamas. he is now sort of changing the law of the land, a power grab. how's this going to work out? is. >> well, i think he's revealed his true stripes. this is not democracy in action, this is a classic effort at one person, one vote, one time. he's, obviously, met resistance. let's hope it's successful. but i think it's just highly ironic that after dozens of commentators left and right in this country hailed muhammad morsi for his responsible conduct with respect to gaza and how he wasn't acting like an an extremist from the muslim brotherhood got what he, got what he needed from the ceasefire agreement and immediately began acting like an extremist from the muslim brotherhood. that should be what we focus on going forward. and for anybody who thinks the ceasefire in gaza is durable, all they had to do was read these headlines about what morsi did in egypt the day after
article, "new york times," egypt tumult, a rift emerges in morsi's team. morsi, who is part of the muslim brotherhood, they say hey, you know what? we're not going to be involved in the process. we're just going to sit back here. we're going to read our koran. and we're just going to sit back. suddenly they decide we're going to be involved in the process, which is all right. and then we see this weekend, morsi is seizing power that he doesn't have. egypt's about to get really ugly again. >> you know, i think that you see the pushback in the streets. morsi's not going to be able to get away with everything that he wants to get away with. they've turned a corner. >> what's his justification for seizing all of this power illegally? >> hubris. the guy -- he had just helped broker a deal in gaza, and he felt that he had some running room with the americans because he, you know, had essentially done our bidding. >> he's got the president of the united states calling him, the american secretary of state. >> that kind of goes to your head. >> yeah. i'm a big guy. >> you know, you live half your
-5 on the road this year. >>> coming up in the "newsroom," protests escalating in egypt. people angry over the egyptian president mohamed morsi and what they call a power grab. we'll take you live to tahrir square. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. tintroducing a revolutionary. this it new mascara.r aleve. clump crusher...crusher. 200% more volume. zero clumps. new clump crusher from easy, breezy, beautiful covergirl. [ male announcer ] can a car be built around a state of mind? ♪ announcing the all-new 2013 malibu from chevrolet. ♪ with a remarkable new interior featuring the available chevrolet mylink infotainment system. this is where sophisticated styling begins. and where it ends? that's up to you. it's here -- the greatest malibu ever. ♪ anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and b
. >> and there is the concern of how egypt will react. what is the word there on how they are reacting? >> well, we already heard from egypt's president and the foreign minister. they have condemned the emergency meeting in the arab league to explore popular options. egypt says it will open the border with gaza to completely allow all wounded and injured and anybody else who wants to get out. we are getting initial reports that the prime minister may be leading a high delegation visit tomorrow. that would be unprecedented given the security situation here. >> a ayman, thank you so much. appreciate it. from the middle east to back home. let's take a look at what is happening this hour. the president will land in new york city within the next 30 minutes, where he will tour the damage done by superstorm sandy. he will be greeted by andrew cuomo and governor bloomberg. and there are two closed door meetings on the deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. one is taking place with the house intelligence committee and the the other with the house foreign affairs committee. there are new developments on th
in egypt. is this conflict about to become something much more profound, prolonged, and serious? >> reporter: well, it certainly has the potential to, and it's important to emphasize really this chapter in a prolonged conflict between israel and the palestinians certainly has entered into a new dimension when it comes to the gaza strip. this isn't the first time they have exchanged this type of gunfire. in fact, we saw four years ago the operation that was unfolded, very reminiscent of what we're seeing now. that's the concern many palestinians have here. 1.5 million people in gaza bracing themselves for more violence. the concern is whether israel will launch a ground offensive. there is precedence for it. that's why many palestinians are fearful that in the coming days this can only get worse. a lot of people are questioning the effects of all of this. why is israel continuing to carry out these attacks if it has not been able to stop the rocket fire it set out to stop. when it launched the operation four years ago, it was precisely the same modus operandi for the same objecti
on hamas is on the gaza strip they have egypt governed by the muslim brotherhood uc political instability in jordan. my guess they are the next to fall. 18 months ago the middle east was stable now today it is not an anti-american and it will only get worse. melissa: 18 months ago was pro-american and? >> yes. there was the agreement with israel, mubarak was an ally of the united states, a cut off aid not good to his own people but cooperated with us with the war on terror. all of the ingredients were there 18 months ago they are still there but 75% of the population is under the age of 30. they don't have jobs and the prospects. they toppled their dictator but things have not got better so they are back on the streets. >> did we misinterpret what the appraise saying was about? arab sprained, fighting for there rights when it was about religion? >> more about economic prospects. revolutions happen with a large baby-boom population. american revolution. chinese revolution, french revolution. even eastern europe and the soviet union. with a population bubble when you add economic disaster w
of violent protests in egypt as the nation's islamist president faces growing opposition to his unprecedented power grab, basically saying to the courts in egypt i don't have to listen to you. i'll do what i want e. says it's temporary. demonstrators clashing with police outside of tahrir square. this comes as the appeals report suspends work to protest the decrease that gave mohammed morsi near absolute powers. steve harrigan is live in cairo with the very latest, steve. >> those protestors are out again for the 6th night in a row at tahrir square scuffling with police. we've seen exchanges of rocks and teargas on both sides, several protestors coming away injured, police injured as well. nowhere near the numbers we saw last night where as many as 200,000 demonstrators were in the square. they are demanding not only that the president pull back on his decrease but the entire government gets toppled. judges from two of the courts including the appeals court has gone on strike. they say they are not going to work again until the president takes a step back. we are seeing no comprises from pres
to breaking news out of cairo, egypt. protesters are outraged at egyptian president mohamed morsi's power grab. thousands have gathered calling it the birth of a new pharaoh. attacking the headquarters of morsi's political party in alexandria and set it on fire according to egyptian tv. reza sayah joins us on the phone from tarir square. set the scene for us. reza, are you there? >> reporter: hello? >> reza, can you hear me? >> reporter: carol, i apologize. it is very loud here. i'm going to have a terribly difficult time hearing you. we are at tahrir square where thousands of people have come to protest against egyptian president mohamed morsi and there appears to be clashes between security forces and protest protesters in tahrir square. we just saw hundreds of people run i running away from security forces. we can report that tear gas has been shot in the air, we're assuming by security forces. it's remarkable here, carol, we're hear iing what we heard t years ago during revolution that toppled president mubarak, that people want to topple the regime. you're hearing it again, the anger and
collins said she would need additional information before she could support her nomination. >>> egypt rushing a vote on a final draft of a constitution as protests continue against the president, mohammed morsy. he has faced bitter criticism. >>> the state of texas has filed papers to seize a large ranch owned by the flds, a fundamentalist radical mormon sex that believes in polygamy. its leader, warren jeffs, is serving a life sentence. >>> you never know what you might see on the streets of new york city this is a first. casper the pony and razzie the zebra roaming free on staten island. they got free from the home where they lived. they were returned home safe and sound. >> can you imagine mommy, mommy, look. >> they are getting along just fine. >> moment of kindness captured with a camera. coming up, a young police officer's deed goes viral for all the right reasons.od ays. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ide
's switch gears a little bit to what's going on in egypt. which seems to be sort of gripping us at an international level. morsi on one day is a hero. he's brokered a deal. the second day he's under assault by the very people in the street who swept him into power. how do you assess what's going on and our capacity to nudge him toward maintaining a democratic framework? >> the nudging is being done by members of the international monetary fund and individuals saying to egypt if you want money for your country to thrive, you have to backtrack a little. one of the interesting dynamics going on here is that as difficult as morsi's actions the other day were to swallow for those of us who live in a democracy, the judiciary there is really not blameless either. they dissolved one of the houses of parliament there. there is a threat they may do it to the other legislative body. i do think that morsi might be -- his power grab might be unseemly and undemocratic but there is something nefarious going on by the other branch.
for the opportunity to brief you today on my three- day visit to egypt, israel, the occupied palestinian territory, and jordan. since the situation in does that and israel escalated last week, i made it my priority to contribute to halt the violence with a priority aim of protecting civilians. i canceled a previously planned trip to travel to the middle east as a signal for the need for international diplomatic mobilization and prevent the further escalation that would put the region at risk. to strengthen the commendable efforts by egypt to reach a cease-fire. i want to welcome the cease- fire announcement. i commend the parties for stepping back from the brink and commend the president of egypt for his exceptional leadership. our focus now must be on ensuring that the ceasefire holds and all those needs in gaza, and there are many, that they receive the aid that they need. as i assure their relief for the as i assure their relief for the people in gaza and israel and in the international community, that the violence is stopping. but we are all aware of the risk, and we are all aware that many de
into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in order that people's voices would be heard and reckoned with and they are angry that his camp is in a very brazen way trying to silence that. morsi's decrees, they say, feel they are a sign of times to come. it
. >> we've had jay carney say we support democracy. we believe the government of egypt should reflect the will of the people, and we have concerns of what morsi has done. >> it would be nice if we supported democracy, but i don't think this administration does. let's be honest, george w. bush tried to support democracy in the middle east, and in iraq we gave the iraqis their best shot. >> stephanie: by bombing and killing hundreds of thousands? yes. barack obama does not believe in democracy now? only george bush did. and the fiery remarks of freedom freedom. >> george bush didn't know the difference between sunni and shiite. knew nothing about the country nothing. >> bomb it real good. [ . >> stephanie: i don't miss him. >> grover norquist is the new bad guy. everybody is saying we're going to walk away from grover norquist. all he has done saying, hey, you have enough money on capitol hill. spend what you have, and stop asking us. he has been a watchdog on our money. if you're democrat or republican you should be saluting him to a degree. he warns you in the past people who walk aw
yesterday. intense protests expected again today. morsi declaring egypt's courts cannot overturn decisions he's made since coming into office in june. or over the next six months. one opponent says that can only lead to a dictatorship. morsi has said he's trying to protect egypt's fragile arab spring revolution. he's not trying to accumulate unchecked power. >>> the body of former palestinian leader yasser arafat was exhumed this morning from a mausoleum in the west bank. a team of international scientists will analyze tissue samples in an attempt to determine if he was poisoned to death in 2004 with a radioactive substance. the actual cause of arafat's death was never actually determined. >>> the current head of the palestinian authority travels to the united nations this week for what he hopes will be a vote with a historic outcome. mahmoud abbas, will be present thursday as the general assembly votes on a resolution that would upgrade palestinians to the status of a non-member state. meanwhile, only one week since the cease-fire between israel and hamas, and the u.s. official tells cnn
interest. you take a look at egypt. under the original peace plan, we give tremendous amount of foreign aid to egypt. right now egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening the region because of the arabs spring. we have to rethink the dollars we're spending the egypt. we have to say these dollars are for maintaining a security and a piece. if you are not participating, you do not get them. we have to continue our commitment in foreign policy to israel. israel is our strongest ally. it is our sister country. we need to do everything we can to fulfil our commitment. the military aides we still is a real is that right here in america. when you look at the arab spring, there was a lot of hope that this would be continuing democracy, and we're falling into what has become not secular governments, but religious governments, and we need to be gathering up all of our allies and be making a firm statement that this region needs to be statement -- stabilized. we need to protect the people who serve and our state departments, not in all facets, whether ngo's the state department. it cannot procu
profound effect. to explain how, let me take a detour into the air by spring. in egypt last year when the government shutdown the internet and shut down global service, many asked how are they able to do that. what does it mean that they can do that. it's a very important question. but let me focus on another important question that few people asked. how did egypt, to have an internet and a mobile service worth shutting down? the short answer lies in the most important policy accomplishments of the clinton administration that most people, present company excluded, have never heard of. world trade organization agreement on basic telecommunications. back in the 1990s, monopolies operated communication networks in most countries around the world, generally government owned or controlled monopolies. that was the world most of us grew up in. it was before the internet and mobile communications took off, and it's not a coincidence at the end of that world coincided with a take off of mobile and the internet. in any event back then in the '90s, leaders at the white house, at the state depart
. >> thanks, simon. >>> in egypt mass protests are planned from the muslim brotherhood and opponents in cairo today over the decree giving new powers to morsi. ayman is live in cairo with the latest. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. tens of thousands of protestors have gathered in tahrir square. many of them saying and singing the same songs and chants in the revolution. they changed the name from mubarak to morsi. the demands are the same. many people behind me today have been galvanized by the degree cree of morsi that gave him sweeping powers, including those to legislate without judicial review. it's not just about the decree. they're disappointed with the pace of reform. they're disappointed with the new constitutional assembly writing a constitution. they say it's not pluralistic and does not represent all of egyptians, and more importantly they're angered by the police force in egypt still using the same brutal tactics they used under mubarak. there have been no reforms and no convictions of officers that killed protestors. they're coming out in large numbers behind me. that ha
filed papers with election officials earlier. a formal announcement is expected in january. >>> in egypt, another protest is planned for tomorrow. many are angry with president morsi's attempts to get additional powers. and planning to finish his current term, ehud barak will not seek re-election in january. back to "hardball." >>> welcome back to "hardball." anti-tax crusader grover norquist has been called the most powerful man in washington, but is his influence on the wane? >> i'm not obligated on the pledge. made tennesseans aware, i was just elected, the only thing i'm honoring is the oath i take when i'm sworn in this january. >> when you're $16 trillion in debt, the only pledge we should be making to each other is to avoid becoming greece, and republicans should put revenue on the table. i will violate the pledge, long story short, for the good of the country, only if democrats will do entitlement reform. >> a pledge you signed 20 years ago, 18 years ago is for that congress. for instance, if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed the -- supported a declaration of war ag
me. >>> more protests in egypt. hours before a huge rally against mohamed morsi. many had been camping out for the demonstration against the president who issued several decrees last week that gives him almost absolute power. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. >>> if you read only one thing this morning, in an effort to keep you all hip on emerging trends, the latest trend in tv entertainment. 20-something virgins. the daily beast points out these story lines are actually reflecting real life. it's up on our facebook page at facebook/jansingco. ♪ from jammin' jerk chicken, to cre
times) reports that some senators are threatening to end aid to egypt. mohammad morsy has broadened his powers less repair john mccain says that while the u.s. is thankful for his help facilitating the cease-fire between israel and the gaza strip, he criticized his decision, which has prompted days of violent street protests in egypt. another senator, max baucus, the chairman of the senate finance committee, says that he wants to preserve the estate tax break, which is important for farmers who want to pass down land to their children. he hopes to expand the production tax credit for wind energy. watch the senate live on c- span2. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> you listen to their member, who said the damage was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storm the city has ever faced, and that the tidal surge was 14. governor christie said the damage was unthinkable. we had fires, hurricane-force wind, massive flooding, deep snow. you look at that and the flooding into the subway systems, the shut-down of the stock exchanges, you get a sense of the massive scale
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